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EXTRACTED: Daily News Clips 5/23/22

Mark Hefflinger, Bold Alliance (Photo: Bryon Houlgrave/Des Moines Register

By Mark Hefflinger

News Clips May 23, 2022

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PIPELINE NEWS

  • WBTW: Environmental group hosts public forum against Dominion Energy’s plan for natural gas pipeline in Florence County

  • Pipeline Fighters Hub: Counties and States Can Regulate Pipelines (Webinar: May 23, 2022)

  • Houston Business Journal: Houston private equity firm among backers of Permian-to-Katy gas pipeline

  • Raccoon Valley Radio: GREENE COUNTY SUPERVISORS TO HEAR CARBON PIPELINE UPDATE

  • Vancouver is Awesome: First Nations mean business: Third annual Indigenous Partnership Showcase focuses on economic reconciliation

  • Fairbanks Daily News Miner: Fairbanks Pipeline Training Center grows a workforce

WASHINGTON UPDATES

  • E&E News: Biden under pressure to declare climate emergency

  • Politico: US-EU LAWMAKERS SLAM GAS FINANCE PLAN

  • Reuters: Ukraine war raises fears that efforts to tackle methane emissions from fossil fuels will be reversed

  • Politico: A JUNE SALE

STATE UPDATES

  • Press release: Walk for Appalachia’s Future to Highlight Environmental Justice issues in WV, VA & NC

  • E&E News: Judge: BLM underplayed climate risk in Colo. fracking plan

  • Bloomberg: SpaceX Scrubs Plan to Build Mini LNG Plant at Texas Launch Site

  • Ventura County Star: What oil drilling ballot measures A and B would do locally

  • WFAA: The planet-warming effects behind oil production in West Texas

  • Los Angeles Times: California oil regulator confirms methane leak at idle oil wells in Bakersfield

  • WTAE: Oil spill leads to lane restrictions on Route 51 in the South Hills

EXTRACTION

  • Wall Street Journal: Why Shale Drillers Are Pumping Out Dividends Instead of More Oil and Gas

OPINION

  • Newton Daily News: Ordinance for legal protections for proposed CO2 pipeline presented

PIPELINE NEWS

WBTW: Environmental group hosts public forum against Dominion Energy’s plan for natural gas pipeline in Florence County
Jack Bilyeu, 5/21/22

“An environmental group is calling on residents to take action against a proposed natural gas pipeline in Florence County,” WBTW reports. “The Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League is afraid of serious consequences to residents, their property and the ecosystem. The nonprofit conducted a public forum Saturday at Hannah-Pamplico High School to discuss the project. During the meeting, Lou Zeller, the group’s strategic advisor, played blaring industrial sounds over the gymnasium’s speakers. “I once heard from an actor that one should never abuse their audience in the way I have just abused your ears, but that was an actual recording of a compressor station, which is necessary on every pipeline to move the gas from point A to point B,” Zeller said… “Dominion Energy’s pipeline will cause air pollution, water contamination, because gas lines leak,” Kathy Andrews, director of the Blue Ridge Environmental Defense League, told WBTW. She said she thinks it would decrease property values and endanger the health of residents. “This is already a compromised area,” Andrews told WBTW. “People have cancer, asthma, heart disease and respiratory problems. This will only aggravate those problems.” She said the South Carolina Environmental Law Project has filed a lawsuit to prevent the project from moving forward. She urged residents to contact their representatives to speak out against the project… “Andrews told WBTW similar projects were halted in North Carolina and Virginia. She said she hopes the same will happen in Florence County.”

Pipeline Fighters Hub: Counties and States Can Regulate Pipelines (Webinar: May 23, 2022)
5/23/22

“Register to join (Monday, May 23, 5:30 p.m. Central Time) and hear from experts on what counties can do to regulate pipelines, with a focus on the new proposed carbon dioxide pipelines in the Midwest and Gulf states. Pipeline corporations tell county and state governments that they cannot touch pipelines, because the federal government’s PHMSA and FERC agencies have sole authority to put in place laws regarding pipelines — including with regard to fundamentally local issues like zoning and emergency response. The reality is that there are many areas where a county government is vested with the full legal authority to put in place protections for the land and water in your communities. We will also present the results of a recent poll that shows where Nebraskans stand on carbon pipelines and eminent domain. Speakers: Steven Feit, Center for International Environmental Law (CIEL); Bill Caram, Pipeline Safety Trust; Paul Blackburn, attorney, Bold Alliance; Local county officials in CO2 pipeline impacted states; Jane Kleeb, Bold Alliance. REGISTER ON ZOOM TO JOIN THE MAY 23 WEBINAR: https://bit.ly/countywebinar” 

Houston Business Journal: Houston private equity firm among backers of Permian-to-Katy gas pipeline
Emily Burleson, 5/23/22

“There’s a new Permian Basin pipeline coming to Katy, and one of its developers is backed by a Houston-based private equity firm,” the Houston Business Journal reports. “The four energy companies behind the Matterhorn Express pipeline have made a final investment decision to build the project now that it has enough customers committed, Austin-based WhiteWater Midstream, one of the developers, said in a May 19 announcement. Other partners include Dallas-based EnLink Midstream LLC (NYSE: ENLC), Oklahoma City-based exploration and production company Devon Energy Corp. (NYSE: DVN), and MPLX (NYSE: MPLX), the midstream-focused limited partnership formed by Ohio-based Marathon Petroleum Corp. (NYSE: MPC). Matterhorn Express’ design calls for 490 miles of pipe that can carry 2.5 billion cubic feet of natural gas per day between the Waha gas hub in the Permian Basin and the Katy area west of Houston — also a major gas trading hub. The pipeline should be ready for commercial operations in the third quarter of 2024, WhiteWater said, as the companies work through regulatory approvals… “The Houston midstream company told BizJournals it already has one “foundation shipper” signed on for half of the proposed 650 million cubic feet per day of additional capacity… “Once final investment decisions are made on the Permian Highway and Gulf Cost Express gas compression projects, it should take only 18 months to complete the work, Kinder Morgan CEO Steve Kean has said.”

Raccoon Valley Radio: GREENE COUNTY SUPERVISORS TO HEAR CARBON PIPELINE UPDATE
Coltrane Carlson, 5/23/22

“The Greene County Board of Supervisors will meet today. The Board will hear an update of the Summit Carbon Solutions pipeline project, as well as consider approving an amendment to the current fiscal year budget following a public hearing,” Raccoon Valley Radio reports. “…The meeting will take place electronically and in-person at 8:30am from the boardroom in the courthouse in Jefferson. To access the meeting, call 1-253-215-8782 or 1-301-715-8592 with meeting ID 585 769 486, or via Zoom application with a link below. https://zoom.us/j/585769486 Passcode: 50129”

Vancouver is Awesome: First Nations mean business: Third annual Indigenous Partnership Showcase focuses on economic reconciliation
Nelson Bennett, 5/22/21

“If First Nations are so opposed to the Coastal GasLink pipeline, why are 16 of them, including the West’suwet’en First Nation, planning to take a 10% equity stake in the pipeline?,” Vancouver is Awesome reports. “And does a treaty infringement case won by the Blueberry River First Nation necessarily mean no more natural gas extraction can take place in Treaty 8 territory? Examples of First Nations in B.C. and across Canada partnering with resource industries and business as part of economic reconciliation will be the topic of a two-day conference next week. The third Indigenous Partnership Success Showcase takes place Thursday and Friday (May 26 and 27) at the Fairmont Pacific Rim Hotel. “Showcasing progress made towards genuine economic reconciliation through partnerships with corporate Canada creates an opportunity for all of us to come away with learnings we can take home and use to advance our own work,” event chairman, Squamish Nation Chief Ian Campbell told VIA… “Members of the Saulteau First Nation and the Cheslatta Carrier Nation will speak at a panel discussion on the Coastal GasLink pipeline. Earlier this year, TC Energy Corporation (TSX,NYSE:TRP) announced plans to sell a 10% stake in the natural gas pipeline to a consortium of 16 First Nations.”

Fairbanks Daily News Miner: Fairbanks Pipeline Training Center grows a workforce
Maisie Thomas, 5/22/22

“Approximately 60 juniors and seniors enrolled in the Fairbanks North Star Borough schools will spend the next two weeks getting a taste of pipeline-related trades,” the Fairbanks Daily News Miner reports. “It’s part of the mission of the Fairbanks Pipeline Training Center, whose goal is to train a locally-grown workforce for Alaska’s oil and gas industry, and the reason for the center’s Introduction to Trades course. Participants, taught by apprenticeship instructors, choose a trade and spend the next two weeks — a total of 72 hours — immersed in the specific labor, such as carpentry and welding. The courses give students a glimpse of different skills necessary to work in the main trades, including laborers, pipefitters, operating engineers and teamsters… “According to Denny, what’s next for FPTC depends largely on the workforce demand. “A lot of it depends on what jobs are coming,” he told the Miner. For example, there are several pipeline projects currently being considered in Alaska, said Denny. “We want to make sure that Alaskans are prepared to take on these jobs…We feel very strongly that Alaska does oil and gas as well as anybody else in the world, and we want to maintain those opportunities for generations to come,” Denny told the Miner.

WASHINGTON UPDATES

E&E News: Biden under pressure to declare climate emergency
Scott Waldman, 5/23/22

“A growing number of Democrats are concerned they have little to offer voters on climate in November’s midterm elections. So they want President Joe Biden to meet the world’s rising temperatures with a little fire of his own — by declaring a national climate emergency,” E&E News reports. “This is a clear shot to get something done, I don’t see a better way to harness the energy and the focus on climate than this,” Rep. Earl Blumenauer (D-Ore.), who has been leading the effort in Congress to get the White House to act, told E&E. Democrats have been eager to score a major climate policy win, especially since many of them will have to explain to voters in the coming months why they haven’t delivered on Biden’s major climate pledges… “ The declaration of a national climate emergency wouldn’t just be for show; it would give the Biden administration some executive authorities and funding to build out clean energy resources. That includes powers under the National Emergencies Act, the Defense Production Act, and the Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act. Those can help protect vulnerable Americans from climate change and fund a clean energy revolution in response. The U.S. government already has determined that climate change poses a national security threat. To be sure, the declaration of a climate emergency wouldn’t provide Biden with a magic wand to help him deliver on the $2 trillion in climate spending he pledged on the campaign trail. But it could unlock billions of dollars annually to help shift the U.S. economy away from fossil fuels and toward clean energy… “Almost 400 organizations called on Biden to invoke his powers under the National Emergencies Act to declare an emergency. Days into the administration, Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) said Biden should declare an emergency. Shortly after Biden took office, Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.), Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Blumenauer introduced the “National Climate Emergency Act,” which would require Biden to use the authorities he is granted under the National Emergencies Act. And in April, about 30 House Democrats called on Biden “to use the full power of the executive branch to combat climate change by declaring a national climate emergency.”

Politico: US-EU LAWMAKERS SLAM GAS FINANCE PLAN
Matthew Choi, Josh Siegel, 5/20/22

“Members of both the House and the European Parliament wrote to Biden and European Commission President Ursula von der Leyen urging them not to allow the response to the war in Ukraine to include new financing of fossil fuel infrastructure, licensing or extraction,” Politico reports. “The 45 signatories included Democrats Elizabeth Warren and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and Green MEPs, including Marie Toussaint, and Socialists and Democrats, including Mohammed Chahim. They said the transatlantic Task Force for Energy Security should set up guardrails so that “our countries not lock ourselves into decades of further reliance on fossil fuels when climate science, environmental justice, and public health concerns necessitate a rapid transition towards full renewable energy.” One day after the EU’s REPowerEU proposal that would spend billions on oil and gas infrastructure, the lawmakers said: “Liquefied natural gas (LNG) infrastructure can take at least three years to build, thus failing to address Europe’s short-term energy needs to transition off Russian gas.”

Reuters: Ukraine war raises fears that efforts to tackle methane emissions from fossil fuels will be reversed
Terry Slavin, 5/19/22

“The International Energy Agency (IEA) says if the oil and gas industry is to have any role in the energy transition it will have to urgently up its game in tackling methane emissions,” Reuters reports. “Despite numerous industry efforts in recent years to tackle the powerful greenhouse gas, which is 84 times more potent than CO2 in the short term, the agency reported in February that methane emissions from the energy sector, including coal, grew by just under 5% last year. Significant emissions were confirmed in the Permian basin in Texas, where 30% of U.S. oil and gas is produced and processed, and in parts of Central Asia, with the amount wasted equal to all the gas used in Europe’s power sector, the IEA said… “While the oil and gas industry is only responsible for about a quarter of methane emissions, the IEA stresses that it is the sector where they can be most easily addressed. Not only is it technically feasible to prevent 70% of methane leakages, but the current record-high natural gas prices justify investing in measures to abate leakage… “But experts say delivering on that commitment, at least in the short term, has been dealt a setback by the crisis in Ukraine, with countries scrambling to secure supplies to replace Russian oil and gas, and high prices incentivising companies to ramp up production. One concern is that a scramble to increase the production and processing of natural gas to ship to Europe will contribute to increases in emissions of methane in the Permian basin, where one study estimated that as much as 3.7% of gas production is being vented and leaked into the atmosphere – more than twice the Environmental Protection Agency’s (EPA) estimate. Climate scientists say that at methane leakage rates of 3.2%, gas emissions are more dangerous to the climate than coal… “Mark Brownstein, who leads on energy for the Environmental Defense Fund (EDF), told Reuters from EDF’s monitoring and reporting on methane emissions in the Permian basin, “we do see evidence of individual companies improving their performance … but it has not yet added up to improvements in the basin’s overall emissions performance”.

Politico: A JUNE SALE
Matthew Choi, Josh Siegel, 5/20/22

“In case you missed the Senate Energy Committee’s rather colorful interrogation of Interior Secretary Deb Haaland, she announced Thursday a June 30 deadline for DOI’s next five-year offshore leasing proposal, and everyone is pouncing on the chance to shape the forthcoming plan,” Politico reports. “House Natural Resources Chair Raul Grijalva (D-Ariz.) called for a leasing plan with as few offshore drilling lease sales as possible to ”break our dependency on oil and gas extraction.” The five-year proposals are mandated by the Outer Continental Shelf Leasing Act, but the Natural Resources Defense Council asserted it doesn’t actually have to include new lease sales… “House Natural Resources ranking member Bruce Westerman (R-Ariz.) expressed relief Thursday that the plan is in the works, but told Politico that delaying future lease sales “is what drives industries to other nations with poor environmental records, when we can produce energy safer, cleaner and cheaper here in America.” The American Petroleum Institute’s Frank Macchiarola told Politico that June 30 should be when a plan is finalized rather than first proposed. New lease sales won’t be possible until November at the earliest on DOI’s timeline, and Macchiarola cast doubt they’ll occur before the end of the year.”

STATE UPDATES

E&E News: Judge: BLM underplayed climate risk in Colo. fracking plan
Niina H. Farah, 5/23/22

“A federal judge last week blocked hydraulic fracturing over 35,000 acres on Colorado’s Western Slope after finding federal officials had failed to do enough to account for climate risk,” E&E News reports. “Senior Judge Marcia Krieger of the U.S. District Court for the District of Colorado on Friday ordered the Bureau of Land Management and Forest Service to redo the North Fork Mancos Master Development Plan, which had allowed construction of 35 new wells in parts of Grand Mesa and the Uncompahgre and Gunnison national forests. The order reinforces that the federal government cannot avoid disclosing the climate impacts of its actions, Melissa Hornbein, a senior attorney with the Western Environmental Law Center, told E&E. “The Bureau of Land Management has to confront the dissonance between its proposal for fracking in an area already disproportionately affected by climate change, and the reality that, to maintain any chance of keeping warming below the critical 1.5°C threshold, the government cannot approve any new fossil fuel projects.” “…They argued that the agencies violated procedural law and the National Environmental Policy Act by not doing enough to consider the climate or water impacts in the analyses underpinning their decisionmaking. The agencies had also failed to present reasonable alternatives to the plan, the groups said. Rather than defend the development plan, BLM and the Forest Service under President Joe Biden acknowledged there were “substantial concerns with the NEPA analysis” by the prior administration but argued that sending the decisions back to the agencies would be enough to correct the problems identified in the lawsuit. Krieger, a George W. Bush appointee, was unconvinced that the case met the standard for sending back an agency decision for reconsideration without requiring the government to start from scratch.”

Bloomberg: SpaceX Scrubs Plan to Build Mini LNG Plant at Texas Launch Site
Sergio Chapa, 5/19/22

“Elon Musk-owned SpaceX has scrapped plans to build a small-scale liquefied natural gas plant at the rocket company’s Boca Chica launch site in Texas, federal documents show,” Bloomberg reports. “SpaceX no longer proposes to build a desalination plant, power plant, natural gas pre-treatment system and liquefier at the site’s vertical launch area, the US Fish & Wildlife Service said in a May 12 document obtained by Bloomberg through an open records request… “Musk, a fan of vertical integration, at one point planned to drill wells at the launch site to produce his own natural gas to be treated, superchilled into liquid and used as rocket fuel… “A coalition of environmentalists and community groups oppose SpaceX’s expansion at the Texas beach where the Rio Grande empties into the Gulf of Mexico.”

Ventura County Star: What oil drilling ballot measures A and B would do locally
Kathleen Wilson, 5/22/22

“As oil companies tell it, passage of measures A and B on the June 7 ballot would end all oil and gas production in Ventura County along with thousands of jobs,” the Ventura County Star reports. “The environmental group leading the “yes” campaign warns that the drilling could contaminate drinking and irrigation water if the oil interests prevail in their multimillion-dollar campaign. Campaign slogans implore voters to choose between two imperatives: “Stop the Energy Shutdown” vs. “Protect Water.” “…The local League of Women Voters said the proponents’ argument that the measures would better protect water and community health is “reasonable” but “speculative.” “…Oil and gas development is the only known industry still operating under decades-old permits with outdated standards, county planners told the Star. The permits are held by some of the industry’s biggest players, including Aera Energy, which has largely funded the $8.2 million campaign to defeat the measures. The company, which is jointly owned by affiliates of ExxonMobil and Shell, has contributed $7.4 million to the effort. Oil interests have outraised the other side by more than 10 to 1 in what has become the costliest ballot measure in county history. Aera officials declined to answer questions on the permits or why they are investing heavily in the campaign. They referred questions to the campaign spokesman, Ben Oakley of the Western States Petroleum Association, who told the Star the funds help get their message to the voters.”

WFAA: The planet-warming effects behind oil production in West Texas
David Schechter, 5/22/22

“There are many ways that Texas leads the country–one of them is how much methane we release into the atmosphere, a invisible heat-trapping gas that’s still managing to catch eyes,” WFAA reports. “…Schuyler Wight is a rancher in Imperial, about an hour south of Odessa. And he’s got a problem on his land: old, leaky oil wells… “Schuyler estimates, on his property, there are 100 orphan wells. The worst one on his property is bubbling up oil with a heavy stink of gas. “It’s killing everything around here and it’s poison,” he told WFAA. “I mean, would you want to eat beef that comes from cattle and drink this, crap like that? That’s how I make my living.” There’s another major orphan well problem on a neighboring ranch. It’s bubbling up with so much underground water a new lake has formed. But not the kind of lake you’d ever want to swim in. Air and water samples found some gases here at potentially lethal levels. How bad is the problem? A study from McGill University suggests abandoned oil and gas wells may be a Top 10 source of methane emissions in the U.S. “Why is it that I have to spend my time and money and energy plugging your wells?” Schuyler recently said when speaking at the public meeting of the Texas Railroad Commission… “Stuart MacDonald is the Director of Energy Land Management at the University of Texas – Permian Basin in Odessa who also consults for the oil and gas industry. “The number-one way to stop flaring and stop venting is to come up with a way to get the gas to market,” he told WFAA. “And I’m talking about pipelines that get it to places that we could use it. That’s been a problem in the oil and gas industry since the twenties and thirties.” 

Los Angeles Times: California oil regulator confirms methane leak at idle oil wells in Bakersfield
NATHAN SOLIS, 5/22/22

“State regulators have confirmed a methane gas leak at a pair of idle oil wells near a residential neighborhood in Bakersfield, raising the concerns of local environmental groups who fear the problem might be more widespread,” the Los Angeles Times reports. “It’s unclear how long the leaks described as “pinhole-sized” went undetected, but state regulators said they were sealed by Friday evening. Earlier this month, researcher Clark Williams-Derry from Washington state walked onto the Kern Bluff oil field in northeast Bakersfield and discovered an audible hiss coming from two oil wells. The wells sit approximately 400 feet from a home in a suburban housing development and were previously managed by Sunray Petroleum Inc. Williams-Derry told the Times the oil wells look like spouts jutting from the ground and are covered by blue barrels, but are exposed to the open air. He told the Times there are many more blue barrels in the oil field like the one he found… “Last Tuesday, an inspector from the San Joaquin Valley Air Pollution Control District confirmed the methane leak in Bakersfield and reported it to the California Geologic Energy Management Division, the state’s oil and gas regulator. CalGEM said the leaks were minor and not deemed an emergency by the air district and the Bakersfield Fire Department… “Democratic Assemblyman Rudy Salas Jr., who represents Bakersfield, told the Times in a statement, “I am upset to learn that this dangerous leak is happening in our community. Let’s stop the leak and find out who is responsible to fix the problem.” “…Organizer Cesar Aguirre with Central California Environmental Justice Network has canvassed the surrounding neighborhood to inform residents about the methane leak and said several residents complained about feeling ill in the last few weeks. “When I told them there is a gas leak in the area, their faces just went white, like they were in shock, because at one home there was four kids running around in the background playing and they had their windows open,” Aguirre told the Times.

WTAE: Oil spill leads to lane restrictions on Route 51 in the South Hills
Nick Matoney, 5/23/22

“A large oil spill has led to lane restrictions on Route 51 between Town Square Way in Brentwood and Borough Park Drive in Whitehall,” WTAE reports. “The oil spill is in the southbound lanes. The Whitehall Borough police chief told WTAE lane restrictions are in place and drivers are advised to reduce their speed and not drive through the oil. Cleanup is expected to last several hours. Drivers should expect delays.”

EXTRACTION

Wall Street Journal: Why Shale Drillers Are Pumping Out Dividends Instead of More Oil and Gas
Ryan Dezember, Matt Grossman, 5/23/22

“Shale drillers have been hamstrung by pipeline constraints, rising prices for oil-field supplies and shortages of roughnecks and rigs. But there is another reason the highest oil and gas prices in years haven’t tempted U.S. drillers to boost output: Their executives are no longer paid to,” the Wall Street Journal reports. “Executives at firms including Pioneer Natural Resources Co., Occidental Petroleum Corp. and Range Resources Corp. were once encouraged by compensation plans to produce certain volumes of oil and gas, with little regard for the economics. After years of losses, investors demanded changes to how bonuses are formulated, pushing for more emphasis on profitability. Now, executives who were paid to pump are rewarded more for keeping costs down and returning cash to shareholders, securities filings show. The shift has contributed to a big turnaround for energy stocks, which have surged through an otherwise down market. Energy shares led 2021’s bull market and this year those included in the S&P 500 are up 46%, compared with an 18% decline in the broader index. The focus on profitability over growth also helps explain drillers’ muted response to the highest prices for oil and natural gas in more than a decade… “Shale drillers have told investors in recent weeks they will stick with drilling plans made when commodity prices were much lower and maintain steady output. Instead of chasing higher fuel prices by drilling, shale executives say they will use profits to retire debt, pay dividends and buy back stock, which boosts the value of shares that remain outstanding. Nine shale-oil firms that reported first-quarter results during the first week of May collectively said they shelled out $9.4 billion to shareholders via buybacks and dividends, about 54% more than they invested in new drilling projects… “Companies were burning cash and trying to maximize production,” Kristoff Nelson, director of credit research at investment manager Income Research + Management, told the Journal. “That’s not what investors are looking for anymore.”

OPINION

Newton Daily News: Ordinance for legal protections for proposed CO2 pipeline presented
Sophie Neems, Montezuma, 5/22/22

“Community members gathered at the Montezuma courthouse, with Iowa Citizens for Community Improvement, on May 12 to present an ordinance to our Poweshiek County Board of Supervisors that will provide legal protections from the proposed CO2 pipeline by Navigator,” Sophie Neems writes for the Newton Daily News. “This ordinance was drafted by Food and Water Watch legal staff and accounts for current Iowa law. Poweshiek County supervisors have already submitted a formal objection to the Iowa Utilities Board. This ordinance differs from an objection by adding requirements and fees should the pipeline permits be granted by the IUB. The ordinance in its current state calls for pipeline companies to pay surveying fees totaling $15,000, establish safety plans by the private sector who owns the pipeline, guarantee full restoration of land on Navigator’s dime, and more. Without this ordinance, we would be subject to safety hazards by way of the pipeline. This proposed pipeline, from a private company, could become our county’s problem. Join me in contacting our County Supervisors to tell them thank you for considering an ordinance, that we support them in taking bold action to protect Poweshiek County, and to stay strong against any pushback that they may receive from Navigator!”

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